The Reason I’m Still Vegan

So for Christmas 2015, my aunt made me some ice cream. Everything she does is lovely so I was ready to have it. Unfortunately, she’d made one mistake in the ingredients: honey. It’s the thing that a lot of people don’t classify as vegan (I even got a honey sesame snap bar for Christmas 2016!) so they tend to forget about it. I was having a dilemma about honey at that moment because I really didn’t want to disappoint her, she’d gone to so much effort, and at one point I was saying that I’d eat it — but I couldn’t eat it. Even though it was just honey, I felt so much guilt about eating it that I couldn’t. This guilt rises up in my heart and I know that I can’t change my habits.

There are two types of vegans: health vegans and moral vegans. I’m a moral vegan. I also hate breaking promises and I promised myself that I would not be tempted by anything, so I stuck to it. The few occasions I have accidentally had non-vegan stuff made me feel sick to my stomach with the guilt. I just felt like a horrible person, even though I know a lot of you probably eat it without thinking. I’m not trying to turn you, promise! I’m not like that. I’m the only vegan in my family so I’m around non-vegan substances all day. I’m quite proud that I haven’t intentionally had something but I know that if I realised something wasn’t vegan but I felt bad about not eating it, I would still not eat it, literally because of the feeling I get. I made so many mistakes in the first few months but now I’m doing a lot better!

The guilty feeling even comes when I’m eating something that tastes real but isn’t (vegan scrambled eggs!!!) because I feel like I’m breaking my promise, even though I’m not. I care so deeply for other animals, whatever they may be, wherever they may come from, that I find it easy to continue being a vegan. There are a lot of foods I liked before being vegan, but I know that there will always be alternatives, and the alternatives are usually just as good (vegan scrambled eggs, like seriously try them dudes) and I enjoy them a lot. Being a vegan is very personal to me and I am going to be a vegan for as long as I can, and I’m alright with you not being a vegan. We all have different values and we show our support to the causes we really believe in. This is a cause I believe in.

Thank you so much for reading this post,

Lia

When I Was Younger

When I was younger, one time I went to my aunt’s house (probably for Christmas, as is the tradition), and my cousin’s boyfriend-at-the-time was there. He was a vegan and I’d never met a real-life vegan before. I didn’t understand veganism. Why on Earth would anyone choose tofu over bacon? I was definitely a lover of meat and a lover of cakes. I was your typical kid! Also, why was he not sitting on the perfectly-comfortable leather sofa?

Gradually, as the years went on, I realised that he wasn’t from an alien race. He just had different beliefs. I became a vegetarian one year, vegan the next, because of my beliefs. My brother and my dad eat meat and I’m okay with that, so when a friend apologises to me for eating meat in front of me, I’m used to it, and they shouldn’t be apologising. I want to get rid of the barrier that’s blocking meat-eaters and vegans. I want to hang with someone without having to explain why I’m not eating the same things as them. I want our beliefs to be separate and not to get mixed up, because that causes me tension. When people question my beliefs, I want to just shut my ears!

It. is. my. choice. 

Also, please don’t think negatively of all vegans because a few have pushed their beliefs strongly onto you and you’re sick of it. Living with meat-eaters, if I strangled them every time they ate meat, it’d be a daily habit! I don’t mind that they eat meat either. Obviously, I’d prefer it if I lived in a vegan household, for dinner conveniences, but them eating meat: that is their choice. I’m not going to blow up their choice and they shouldn’t blow up mine.

We make choices everyday. We have different beliefs. Yet, we continue as one society. Isn’t that something to be savoured, not destroyed? Terrorism is saying there is only one way to live, and that isn’t true. I believe we can all live in the way that makes us happiest. If that’s eating meat, or not, or eating cheese, or not, then just do it! I might believe one thing, you might believe another; I might cry when I think about how some animals suffer for this, you might not think about it at all — but we can live in harmony. We can live together, whatever.

I’m adopting a jaguar this year, for Christmas. Last year, it was a Snow Leopard for my birthday. I just want to make those creatures have a happy life, like us. That’s what makes me happy, so that is important. Whatever makes you happy is important too. 🙂

What makes you happy?

Vegan Scrambled Egg!

So today, for the first time, I tried vegan scrambled egg. I was a bit sceptical of it because, I mean, how can you get the same flavour?

And then I tried it.

It tasted so real, my body almost went into a meltdown because I haven’t had scrambled egg for more than two years. My body was like noo this is real, but the powder was there. There was no egg. It wasn’t real. Yet, it was.

It tasted so authentic… I just don’t really know how they did it! It was awesome. 🙂

Vegan Double Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe

I thought I’d share this amazing recipe for cookies which is vegan (and you won’t believe it).

INGREDIENTS

(can make 6 – 12 cookies, dependant on how big you want each one)

125g vegan butter (Vitalite is my recommendation)

125g granulated sugar

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

250g plain white flour

1 teaspoon baking powder

1 tablespoon cocoa powder

40g vegan chocolate chips

STEP ONE

Cream the butter and sugar in a large bowl until fluffy. Stir in the vanilla extract and mix thoroughly.

STEP TWO

In a separate bowl combine the flour, baking powder, cocoa powder, and chocolate chips. Add this to the cream butter and mix until a soft dough is formed.

STEP THREE

Shape into a log, wrap in clingfilm or foil, and refrigerate for at least an hour (or preferably overnight).

STEP FOUR

To bake, preheat the oven to 180C/gas mark 4. Divide and roll the cookies into equally-sized balls before spacing them well apart on a baking sheet.

STEP FIVE

Bake in batches. Each batch should take 15 – 20 minutes to cook. Slightly underdone is best as the cookies will firm up when cooled.

STEP SIX

Leave to cool on the baking sheet for a few minutes, then carefully transfer them to a wire cooling rack.

STEP SEVEN

Enjoy! 🙂

You can adapt this recipe as you like to create different types of cookies.

I hope you enjoyed this post,

Lia 🙂