Worries

I worry every day. I can’t stop the flooding in my brain. I worry about the fact that only 16% of autistic adults are in full time paid employment, and that only 32% are in any kind of paid work. I worry about the fact that I don’t look autistic and most people don’t realise just how autistic I am. They think I can fix my autistic traits if they keep telling me how to improve myself, but you can’t fix autism. It stays with you forever. I worry about the fact I may lose all my friends one day through my lack of understanding social communication. I say the wrong things often and I don’t understand why it was the wrong thing. I don’t understand other people’s social signals, either. I think I’m losing friends already.

I worry about the fact that 1 in 3 autistic adults are experiencing severe mental health problems and I think I’m one of them because I can’t see properly most days. All I see in front of me are traps. I think about all the ways I could fail in life frequently, and it isn’t enough to just think positive. I try, but then I think about all the negatives of that positive.

I worry about the fact that I want to do something big with my life but that I will never get the chance to. Don’t say I can if I try. Then, I’ll feel worse about not doing it. My autism looks like it doesn’t affect me much so people encourage me to do things that they would never encourage someone with a more visible disability to do. Just because mine is invisible, people think I can do things. I’ve tried to do more with my life and it ended in terrible situations each time, because of my autism. Each time, I remember back to those scenarios, and I think they will happen again. That is why I cannot do what I want with my life. I cannot experience the opportunities many are lucky to grab. It will end badly.

I cannot see any future for myself, personally. I see the future of everyone else around me — but not me. I have no future. One day, I might be all alone and not know how to cope with the world I’ll be all alone in, and that frightens me the most. I fear that I will be stationary, like a statue, for my entire life. I once had dreams and aspirations that burned down before me when I realised I can never complete those.

I’m depressed. I’m anxious. I’m autistic. No one wants to deal with someone like me. I’m too complicated for them. I’m a mess. I lie to people most of the time with simple texts and funny pictures. I don’t want to be remembered for being a fraud. I want to be remembered for being an author who volunteered with animals regularly, but that is not going to happen. I have had far too many set-backs already. My autism is literally stopping me from getting opportunities (I was turned down by a volunteer agency when they found out I was autistic, despite the fact I could do whatever tasks they wanted me to). I have tried more than once to fit in with society and it did not work out.

The truth is that I’m tired. I feel like an alien. No one understands me. I will not speak this aloud but I will write it in a blog post because that’s what my blog is about. Expressing myself.

Honestly, my pets are what keep me going. Seeing them each day gives me something to smile about, but there’s not much more for me to smile at anymore. I feel alone and frightened about my future. I have my family but they won’t be here forever, so what happens then?

I don’t know.

Lia

 

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9 thoughts on “Worries

  1. My son, 14, was recently diagnosed. I have for him many of the concerns you have for yourself. I myself (although never diagnosed) have many of the problems you listed. Remember, life is long and change, while slow, is possible. My life isn’t perfect, but it’s not miserable either. There are definitely workplaces where you will fit in. I work in a library, and many positions are public facing jobs, many are not. I’m not saying this is where you should work, but I’d be astonished if we didn’t have 2 or 3 employees on the spectrum.

    Liked by 1 person

    • thank you. I think you’re right, life is long so I have a lot of time to try and figure it out. I hope your son is happy, hopefully he will get the support he needs. I was diagnosed at 15 myself so it was a bit later than I would have liked (I couldn’t get much support at school) which I think has been a big part of my issues. If I had been diagnosed a little earlier, I probably could have had a lot of support at school. A library sounds interesting but I’m terrified of job interviews! I have selective mutism and it usually comes out in the most stressful situations, like job interviews.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I have a lot of advice on this topic, which I’ll try to keep to myself. But the fact that you seem intelligent and are a good writer will go a long way for you. Fortunately, even though my son didn’t yet have his diagnosis, he got a 504 because he clearly needed support. We’ll see how the diagnosis changes things in the coming year.

        Liked by 1 person

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